평촌

Pyeongchon

The history of Pyeongchon new town, situated in the Dongan-gu of Anyang City, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea, goes back to 1988. Three months after the launch of the sixth republic, the then newly elected President Roh Tae-woo announced that he would carry out the promise he made during his election campaigns to build two million houses during his tenure. In 1989, one year after the successful hosting of the 1988 Olympic Games, the government presented its plans for the new towns of Bundang, Ilsan, Pyeongchon, Jungdong, and Sanbon, and set out to realize its project. It is at this time that the landscape of Pyeongchon, which up until then had for the most part been made up of vineyards, began its transformation into a large-scale apartment complex accommodating 170 thousand residents.

On May 28, 1990, when construction companies unveiled the model houses of the upcoming apartments of Pyeongchon, people responded with great enthusiasm. Newspapers reported that the fever was so high that it took over an hour to get from the Indeokwon intersection to the model houses located just four kilometers away despite the mobilization of some 200 conscripted policemen. Specialists predicted a 30 to 1 competition rate to buy an apartment in Pyeongchon, but the actual competition rose as high as 117 to 1 for an apartment of 32 *pyeong* (approximately 106 sqm).

At the time of development, the population density of Pyeongchon was forecasted at a similary high level as Mok-dong and Sanggye-dong of Seoul and the nearby Gwacheon City. It was because the government planned to transfer the main functions of Anyang City to Pyeongchon as the value of land in the new town was higher and the existing city was small. As a result, public buildings including the city hall, the city council, and the education office as well as the Korea National Oil Corporation, the Anyang NongHyup (National Agricultural Cooperative Federation), and the Korea Research Institute for Human Settlements moved in to the areas around the Pyeongchon and Beomgye subway stations. Pyeongchon is now also the center of academic institutes for preparing high school students to go to college, attracting children and adolescents from even Gwacheon, Sanbon, and Euiwang. It has also become the commercial hub of the southwestern Gyeonggi region with its high concentration of department and discount stores.

With the establishment of the Pyeongchon new town, Anyang’s status was raised to a large city having two administrative districts—Manan-gu and Dongan-gu. Further, with the explosive growth of the commercial area of Pyeongchon, the old commercial center of Anyang started to change as well. The street vendors of Byeoksan-ro moved into the Central Market, public parking lots were created, arcades were set up, and the signages were standardized. Always “under construction,” the old center of Anyang is ever-changing.

정주영 JuYoung Jung ∙ Text

Majored in art theory and received MA on the popularization of art in Modern Korea. Jung is currently preparing her PhD thesis on art management. She started her career as an assistant curator at the Museum of Art Seoul National University (2007), and subsequently worked as an assistant adminstrator at the Korean Society of Art Theories (2007) and a researcher at the Korea Air-affiliated Ilwoo Foundation (2012). She is particularly interested in and writes on contemporary art in Asia.

이제 Leeje ∙ Illustration

Leeje works with the conviction that the world outside pictures can become a more livable place through the world inside pictures. She is interested in the points where desire, despair, and hope intersect. Apart from solo show *Here, Now* (OCI Museum of Art, 2010), Leeje participated in various group shows at Art Space Pool, PKM Gallery, and Gallery Hyundai to name a few. She is currently working on the 2Y2W2V project with artist Han Sue-Ja. 

한수자 Han Sue-ja ∙ Illustration

Han’s practice encompasses many different genres from animation and illustration to participating in group exhibitions. She paricipated in collaborative projects that led to *Binge* (Insa Art Space, Seoul, 2005), *Neverending Story Ko Woo Young* (Arko Art Center, Seoul, 2009), and *Pungnyeon Super Camp* (Art and Garden, 2012). 

어휘록 ∙ Glossary

4회 APAP는 공공예술을 둘러싼 다양한 층위의 주제어들을 선정하여, 각각에 대한 설명 또는 해석의 글을 생산한다. 어휘록의 주제어는 4회 APAP뿐만 아니라 지난 1, 2, 3회 APAP에서 다루었던 공공예술의 주요 개념, 작가와 이론가, 사업 등 다양한 층위를 포함한다. 한편 주제어 설명 글은 이제, 한수자 작가의 일러스트레이션과 함께, APAP의 새로운 웹사이트와 연동하여 매주 하나씩 업데이트한다.

어휘록 소개

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